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The task demanded to connect more than two components to the Arduino processor in order to have a quick view the possibilities that this prototyping device can offer. In this experiment I used a tutorial that I searched in Instructables and I started to explore from there other potential uses: https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Arduino-LED-Dice/ For this experiment I used: -Arduino UNO processor -Bread Board -16 Jumper wires -1 220 ohm resistor   For the first step it is necessary to connect the button to the breadboard, we can place it in the middle. The energy will go from the 5V pin in the arduino processor to the positive lane of the breadboard, from there it must be connected through a cable to one of the sides of the button, the energy will continue through the 10k resistor and then arrive to the negative lane. From the negative lane we must connect the button to the pin 13 of the arduino processor. Every time we will click the button, the arduino processor will transmit a random number through the LEDS from 1 to 6:   In a second step we place the leds on the breadboard:     And then we connect all the negative ports together making “bridges” from one cathode to the other and we connect the positive¬† parts from the LED’s to the the pin ports 2,4,6,8,9,10, and 12 since the arduino processor will transmit the energy from there to the leds in every click:       Code:  
  • // Arduino LED Dice
  • // Made by Aleksandar Tsvetkov
  • // Using button debouncing logic from the Internet!
  • // Available on Instructables, just search it ūüôā
  • const¬†int¬†pins[6]¬†=¬†{2,¬†4,¬†6,¬†8,¬†10,¬†12};
  • int¬†buttonPin¬†=¬†13, buttonStatus, randNum, lastNum, i, lastDebounceTime, debounceDelay¬†=¬†150;
  • void¬†draw(int¬†randN);
  • void¬†setup()¬†{
  • ¬†¬†for¬†(i¬†=¬†0;¬†i¬†<=¬†5;¬†i++)¬†{
  • ¬† ¬† pinMode(pins[i], OUTPUT);
  • ¬†¬†}
  • ¬† pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
  • }
  • void¬†loop()¬†{
  • ¬† buttonStatus¬†=¬†digitalRead(buttonPin);
  • ¬†¬†if¬†(buttonStatus¬†==¬†HIGH¬†&&¬†(millis()¬†¬†lastDebounceTime)¬†>¬†debounceDelay)¬†{
  • ¬† ¬†¬†do¬†{
  • ¬† ¬† ¬† randNum¬†=¬†random(1,¬†6);
  • ¬† ¬†¬†}¬†while¬†(lastNum¬†==¬†randNum);
  • ¬† ¬† draw(randNum);
  • ¬† ¬† lastDebounceTime¬†=¬†millis();
  • ¬† ¬† lastNum¬†=¬†randNum;
  • ¬†¬†}
  • ¬† delay(100);
  • }
  • void¬†draw(int¬†randN)¬†{
  • ¬†¬†for¬†(i¬†=¬†0;¬†i¬†<=¬†5;¬†i++)¬†{
  • ¬† ¬† digitalWrite(pins[i], LOW);
  • ¬†¬†}
  • ¬†¬†for¬†(i¬†=¬†0;¬†i¬†<=¬†randN;¬†i++)¬†{
  • ¬† ¬† digitalWrite(pins[i], HIGH);
  • ¬†¬†}
  • }
    In a second step, I wanted tp use a Photoresistor instead of the button to create a “random” pattern of LED’s define by the light ambience that the photoresistor is receiving, so I replaced the button by a photoresistor in the breadboard and merged the code from a photoresistor exercise from Instructables web site, this second exploration was made with Mikhail Pikman:       The Instructables code: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-use-a-photoresistor-or-photocell-Arduino-Tu/  
// Arduino LED Dice
// Made by Aleksandar Tsvetkov
// Using button debouncing logic from the Internet!
// Available on Instructables, just search it ūüôā
const int pins[6] = {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12};
int pResistor = 13, buttonStatus, randNum, lastNum, i, lastDebounceTime, debounceDelay = 150;
int value;
void draw(int randN);
void setup() {
  for (i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
    pinMode(pins[i], OUTPUT);
  }
   pinMode(pResistor, INPUT);// Set pResistor РA0 pin as an input (optional)
}
void loop() {
    value = analogRead(pResistor);
¬† //You can change value “25”
  if (value > 25){
    digitalWrite(pins[i], HIGH);  //Turn led off{
      randNum = random(1, 6);
    } else{
    digitalWrite(pins[i], LOW); //Turn led on;
The modified Code:
// Arduino LED Dice
// Made by Aleksandar Tsvetkov
// Using button debouncing logic from the Internet!
// Available on Instructables, just search it ūüôā
const int pins[6] = {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12};
int pResistor = 13, buttonStatus, randNum, lastNum, i, lastDebounceTime, debounceDelay = 150;
int value;
void draw(int randN);
void setup() {
  for (i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
    pinMode(pins[i], OUTPUT);
  }
   pinMode(pResistor, INPUT);// Set pResistor РA0 pin as an input (optional)
   Serial.begin(9600);
}
void loop() {
    value = analogRead(pResistor);
¬† //You can change value “25”
  if (value < 30){
    digitalWrite(pins[i], HIGH);  //Turn led on{
      randNum = random(1, 6);
    } else{
    digitalWrite(pins[i], LOW); //Turn led on;
    draw(randNum);
    lastDebounceTime = millis();
    lastNum = randNum;
  }
  delay(100);
  Serial.println(value);
}
void draw(int randN) {
  for (i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
    digitalWrite(pins[i], LOW);
  }
  for (i = 0; i <= randN; i++) {
    digitalWrite(pins[i], HIGH);
  }
}
The most interesting part of this exploration was to understand the large number of applications that simple input can create for creative and design purposes with the use and addition of codes.
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  3d scanning is an interesting tool to transfer volumes, spaces or scenes from the physical space to the virtual space through the use of digital and analog tools. In this post, I explored how this technique could be used for the process of prototyping architecture models with ready-made¬†elements into digital designing platforms such as rhino and movements to recreate space dynamics.   1.Phone scanning; Imagining the scenario that you are having a dinner and you get inspired so you start to prototype something with what you have around and you want to transfer that geometry into the digital world you could use a cell phone 3d scanner.   The procedure is to use an app such as¬†scann3d and a paper that helps the app to measure the element:     After placing the object in the grid, the app tells the user in which parts of the object place the camera so she can take the information.         When the model is ready you can download¬†it but it has a cost.   2. Kinect In a second trial, with Alexey¬†Smirnov imagining the scenario¬†you are in a working place where you can have access to computers and instruments such as Kinect¬†the 3d scanning platform from windows, you could create a model and start the development of the project from the existing object instead of drafting it from zero and the creating volumes by extruding the plans.   For this process we used the free software from windowsstore¬†3d scan and¬†skanect and we designed a small volumetry made with the fragments of a tangerine.       ¬†     The results where nonexistent since the 3d scanner from kinect cannot read small geometries as we thought. It seems to be more suitable for interior spaces, persons or scenes.     4. To continue with the exploration I used the software¬†Agisoft who works thru “the process of photogrammetric processing of digital images and 3D spatial data generation” as it is described on their web page¬†http://www.agisoft.com/, this means that with a serie of pictures the program superpose them and create a 3d model.¬†To realize this exercise¬†I used a tutorial they provide on their web page¬†http://www.agisoft.com/index.php?id=32 and additionally a 30 days trial can be requested. The first step is to open the program and upload the pictures In a second step, it is necessary to mask the images with the use of selection tools, it is recommended to take the pictures with a clear background from a different color of the object so the quick selection tools can be used. When all the pictures are masked in the¬†workflow menu we must choose the¬†align option so photos will be superposed to create a cloud of points in a tridimensional space After the cloud is created we must transform it into a mesh And finally create a texture   The program allow¬†us to export the created mesh into Rhyno Finally, we can integrate our 3d scanned geometry into an urban context digital model and continue with the design process introducing a ready made physical designed based geometry into a digital process that can contribute to achieving new ideas by the exploration of new paths where digital and physical design process can meet. File: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ECq7lZQ-7S24io9Oa2yncV_U2LehNlLV     <!– Auto Updating Copyright Script created with Rapid Purple Webmaster Tools (http://rapidpurple.com). –> <script language=”JavaScript”> <!– function y2k(number) { return (number < 1000) ? number + 1900 : number; } var today = new Date(); var year = y2k(today.getYear()); document.write(‘¬© ‘+year+’ pablo david goldin marcovich – All Rights Reserved’); //–> </script>    

 
The story of a laser cutted, vertical wood structure that tried to reach the Moscovite blue sky.  Made by Mikhail Pikman, Maksim Shurygin and Pablo Goldin In order to understand the pressfit technique, we were assigned to build a plywood tower with only three types of pieces that were no bigger than 15cm in X and Y. The project was realized with autocad for drafting and cutted in a lasser cutting machine Raylogic AS 1290. Our strategy was to create the larger quantity of pieces and to make the tower as narrow and vertical  as  possible. We decided to cross the pieces in 90 degrees and have the maximum contact surface to give more rigidity to the tower. The building design was planned in a canonical manner through clear elements and modulated in multiples of .15 cm: -A large base made of two pieces. -The body made with levels composed of four columns and two crossing beams. -The top that would be generated with the addition of columns.
Even tho we realized during our first test that the size of the interlacing space could not be defined¬†in a very precise way because of the thickness of the laser and that the plywood was not completely flat surface¬† producing variations in the Z plane, we considered that the tower could still resist and be rigid¬†enough to stand high. In addition to that hipothesis we didn’t wanted to lose the thin and elegant proportion of the complete design.
The first obstacle we faced was that the plywood got even more curved because of the humidity so we had to cut the material in half and adapt our DXF. file in the last minute. It is important to understand that the cutting software does not read “blocks” from autocad which is a very common technique for drawing and that we must not leave any “double” lines in the drawing because the laser will pass two times over the same place and reduce the size of the piece. As a consequence, when we built our tower, instead of working as a single rigid element, the addition of minimal imperfections produced a larger deficient structural behavior that ended up in a non sufficiently stable tower who failed to reach the sky because of her ambitiousness in the same way that Icaro.
In a second essay we reduced the size of the connection points and the system worked much better nevertheless it was too tight so we combined the pieces from the first essay and the second and we achieved the tallest tower with success.
https://drive.google.com/drive/my-drive?ogsrc=32
<a rel=”license” href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/“><img alt=”Creative Commons License” style=”border-width:0″ src=”https://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-sa/4.0/88×31.png” /></a><br />This work is licensed under a <a rel=”license” href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/“>Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License</a>.
A four legs platform Task / Preparation The assignment consisted of creating a 10 x 10 x 10 cm plywood object using press fit assemblages in order to understand the design logic of this technique and also the possibilities of the laser cutting machine. The only constrictions were that the object should not be a box and neither a toy. Design Process: In order to achieve the task, I first concentrated in understanding the press fit concept and the kind of assemblage I wanted to use using Pinterest boards and web research.
With the understanding than Press fit assembly consist in creating friction between contact surfaces  of separate objects I thought about generating an element whose structural behaviour could be very clear and could reflect the different kinds of strengths that a pressfit connection can allow. So I just intersected two perpedicular planes and start to think what they could become.
Then, while I was cleaning the kitchen of my dormitory and listening to music from my cellphone I realized I wanted to have a support where I could put it so it would not be in contact with the table or it could float inside a cooking pot to amplify it sound so I decided to design a small platform.
And I began to design the final object using rhino.
The final object was functional and some interesting details where achieved like the “floating” appearance from the round piece but some calculation mistakes were donde since I did not prevented more accurately the size of the laser and how much material it burns. With very small objects its better to do simpler connection that make the piece work as a whole like the central ortogonal connection.
File:    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nMNjC5gCFaP4fz4zT-Shln16gDKC3iCf/view?usp=sharing
<a rel=”license” href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/“><img alt=”Creative Commons License” style=”border-width:0″ src=”https://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-sa/4.0/88×31.png” /></a><br />This work is licensed under a <a rel=”license” href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/“>Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License</a>.

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