Archive for January, 2019

CLASS:TECHNOLOGY, Programming

TASK: Write a simple code for arduino & make a sceme to demonstrate its work.

Software: Arduino IDE

Hardware: Arduino Uno, cables, transistors. breadboard, LEDs.

Author: Daniil.

I decided to make a sequential light, coming from one led to another. I build the example with 3 leds, but really you can use leds as many as you want, thus the prorotype can be endless (or until you have enough arduino Uno and the place tp plug in the components).
Of course, but for the help of the network I couldn’t do the coding myself. So, I decided to search for the idea to get inspired. Finally, here’s the code I got after a couple of manipulation and my friend’s little help:

(yeah yeah yeah, I know the code is very primitive but as a person who has just started writing codes, that was also quite asmall challenge)

After, I took the required components from the Shukhov Lab supplements: breadboard, 4connectors, Arduino Uno, Usb cable, transistors 220 Om each, LEDs.

After 2min manioulations and uploading the code everything worked fine. I’ve shooted a video to show it’s working:

Thanx…

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Michael Pikman, Daniil Tsirkov, Pablo Goldin

Task / Preparation

The task consisted in exploring different 3d scanning techniques to understand the possibilities of this procedure. In this post we will expose our experience with the “milk scanner” software wich can be loaded in this link.

The necessary equipment is:

  • milk
  • recipient
  • web cam

Procedure:

The milk scanner works by creating a displacement map image of the object that can be translated into a 3d model. The object should be placed on the recipient under the web cam and every time a small quantity of milk is poured in it (3 spoons are recommended) the user should take a picture. The superposition of this pictures allows the software to transmite the different heights and contours of the object like slices. This same procedure is used in other softwares such as GIS to create topographic 3d models.

When the scanning is ready, the software provides an .xml file which should be transformed into a displacement map. Nevertheless on that stage we go stocked since we couldn’t introduce this file in any software to continue the procedure.

File:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B20E0JuBXDiMWG5NUXJNVG4wbFF2QjZMbEZkRURsMGl0akNF

Conclusion:

While the “slicing procedure” of the software is quite logical and the simplicity of the procedure allow an easy access of it, this technique require for higher computational skills than regular company softwares.

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</script>

Task:

3D-scan something + remake it

Software:

  • Photoshop CC 2018
  • Agisoft
  • IdeaMaker

Hardware:

  • IPhone
  • nicorn toy
  • Raise N2 (3D printer)

Since the task was to 3D scan whatever we want to and then remake it, I decided to make a clone of a cute statue of rabbit (it has a function of a ring stand) that I have. I have been advised to use Agisoft as a more convenient way to 3D scan with photos. I took pictures of the rabbit, but the software failed to make a proper key points cloud out of it because it had a reflecting surface.

The second choice was a toy of a unicorn. I took more than 30 pictures of it 360 degrees around and edited them in Photoshop to eliminate unnecessary background, so it would be easier to apply masks in Agisoft.

Next step is to import them in Agisoft and make mask for every image there is, align photos, make a cloud, and then a mesh. After all these steps there is quite good 3D scanned model of the unicorn. The only flaw it has is that it failed to properly recognize the gap between unicorn’s legs.

Finally, I imported the model in .obj format, run it through IdeaMaker software for 3D printers, fixed the mistakes the model had, and sent it for 3D printing.

Here is the final result:

And with its prototype 😉

Scann3d, Kinect, Agisoft

Task:

The exercise consisted in scanning an object and rebuild it with a different technique.

Process:

3d scanning is an interesting tool to transfer volumes, spaces or scenes from the physical space to the virtual space through the use of digital and analog tools. In this post, I explored how this technique could be used for the process of prototyping architecture models with ready-made elements into digital designing platforms such as rhino.

  1. Phone scanning

Imagining the scenario that you are having a dinner and you get inspired so you start to prototype something with what you have around and you want to transfer that geometry into the digital world you could use a cell phone 3d scanner.

The procedure is to use an app such as scann3d and a paper that helps the app to measure the element:

After placing the object in the grid, the app tells the user in which parts of the object place the camera so she can take the information.

When the model is ready you can download it but it has a cost.

2. Kinect

In a second trial, with Alexey Smirnov imagining the scenario you are in a working place where you can have access to computers and instruments such as Kinect the 3d scanning platform from windows, you could create a model and start the development of the project from the existing object instead of drafting it from zero and the creating volumes by extruding the plans.

For this process we used the free software from windowsstore 3d scan and skanect and we designed a small volumetry made with the fragments of a tangerine.

The results where nonexistent since the 3d scanner from kinect cannot read small geometries as we thought. It seems to be more suitable for interior spaces, persons or scenes.

3. Agisoft

To continue with the exploration I used the software Agisoft who works thru “the process of photogrammetric processing of digital images and 3D spatial data generation” as it is described on their web page http://www.agisoft.com/, this means that with a serie of pictures the program superpose them and create a 3d model. To realize this exercise I used a tutorial they provide on their web page http://www.agisoft.com/index.php?id=32 and additionally a 30 days trial can be requested.

The first step is to open the program and upload the pictures

In a second step, it is necessary to mask the images with the use of selection tools, it is recommended to take the pictures with a clear background from a different color of the object so the quick selection tools can be used.

When all the pictures are masked in the workflow menu we must choose the align option so photos will be superposed to create a cloud of points in a tridimensional space

After the cloud is created we must transform it into a mesh

The program allow us to export the created mesh into Rhyno

Finally, we can integrate our 3d scanned geometry into an urban context digital model and continue with the design process introducing a ready made physical designed based geometry into a digital process that can contribute to achieving new ideas by the exploration of new paths where digital and physical design process can meet.

File:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ECq7lZQ-7S24io9Oa2yncV_U2LehNlLV

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var today = new Date();
var year = y2k(today.getYear());
document.write(‘© ‘+year+’ pablo david goldin marcovich – All Rights Reserved’);
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Led dice variations

Task / Preparation:

The task demanded to connect more than two components to the Arduino processor in order to have a quick view the possibilities that this prototyping device can offer.

Process:

In this experiment I used a instructables tutorial that I searched in Instructables and I started to explore from there other potential uses:

Components:

  • Arduino UNO processor
  • Bread Board
  • 16 Jumper wires
  • 1 220 ohm resistor
  • 10k resistor
  • Button
  • Photoresistor
  • USB cable
  • 6 Led’s

First approach, the regular dice:

  1. Connect the button to the middle of the “breadboard”
  2. Connect a red cable from the “5v” pin in the arduino UNO device to one of the sides of the breadboard who will the become the “positive lane”of the board.
  3. Connect a cable from the positive lane to the “positive” side of the button
  4. Connect in the same lane a 10 k resistor leg and connect the second one to the negative lane of the board
  5. Connect with a cable the negative lane of the board with the pin 13 of the arduino UNO device.

Every time we click the button, arduino will transmit a signal to light a random number of Led’s

7. Then we must place the Led’s on the board

8. And then we connect all the negative ports together making “bridges” from one cathode to the other and we connect the positive  parts from the LED’s to the the pin ports 2,4,6,8,9,10, and 12 since the arduino processor will transmit the energy from there to the leds in every click. I decided to take the resistors out of the circuit in this part since the energy from was so low that the Led’s where not lighting but it is recommended to use them.

<code>
// Arduino LED Dice
// Made by Aleksandar Tsvetkov
// Using button debouncing logic from the Internet!
// Available on Instructables, just search it :)
const int pins[6] = {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12};
int buttonPin = 13, buttonStatus, randNum, lastNum, i, lastDebounceTime, debounceDelay = 150;
void draw(int randN);
void setup() {
for (i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
pinMode(pins[i], OUTPUT);
}
pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
}
void loop() {
buttonStatus = digitalRead(buttonPin);
if (buttonStatus == HIGH && (millis() - lastDebounceTime) >
debounceDelay) {
do {
randNum = random(1, 6);
} while (lastNum == randNum);
draw(randNum);
lastDebounceTime = millis();
lastNum = randNum;
}
delay(100);
}
void draw(int randN) {
for (i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
digitalWrite(pins[i], LOW);
}
for (i = 0; i <= randN; i++) {
digitalWrite(pins[i], HIGH);
}
}

Second approach: Replacing the button with a photo resistor:

In order to create a “random” pattern of LED’s define by the light ambience that the photoresistor is receiving, so I replaced the button by a photoresistor in the breadboard and merged the code from a photoresistor exercise from Instructables web site, this second exploration was made with Mikhail Pikman:

<!-- wp:code -->
<pre class="wp-block-code"><code>// Arduino LED Dice
// Made by Aleksandar Tsvetkov
// Using button debouncing logic from the Internet!
// Available on Instructables, just search it 🙂
 
const int pins[6] = {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12};
int pResistor = 13, buttonStatus, randNum, lastNum, i, lastDebounceTime, debounceDelay = 150;
int value;
void draw(int randN);
 
void setup() {
  for (i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
    pinMode(pins[i], OUTPUT);
  }
   pinMode(pResistor, INPUT);// Set pResistor – A0 pin as an input (optional)
   Serial.begin(9600);
}
 
void loop() {
    value = analogRead(pResistor);
 
  //You can change value “25”
  if (value < 30){
    digitalWrite(pins[i], HIGH);  //Turn led on{
      randNum = random(1, 6);
    } else{
    digitalWrite(pins[i], LOW); //Turn led on;
 
    draw(randNum);
    lastDebounceTime = millis();
    lastNum = randNum;
  }
  delay(100);
  Serial.println(value);
}
 
void draw(int randN) {
  for (i = 0; i <= 5; i++) {
    digitalWrite(pins[i], LOW);
  }
  for (i = 0; i <= randN; i++) {
    digitalWrite(pins[i], HIGH);
  }
}</code></pre>
<!-- /wp:code -->

CLASS – TECHNOLOGY, 3D Scanning

SOFTWARE: 3D Scan

MACHINE: Kinect, Laptop

CHALLENGES: To try 3D Scanning


TASK / PREPARATION

The task sounded quite simple: try to 3D scan something.

In preparation for the scanning, I installed “3D Scan” software and all necessary drivers for Kinect to use it for scanning.

SCANNING

The object for scanning was a head of David on table.

The result of scanning you can see here.

Result of Scanning

Because of some distance between the IR sensor and the camera, the picture is looking strange. Here we can see a 3D head, something look alike a table and legs of Pablo;)

RESULTS / REFLECTION

Scanning of objects by Kinect allows us to get a 3D body, but in large scales we can get something looking strange because of structure of the scanning machine.

CLASS:TECHNOLOGY, 3D-PRINTING

TASK: Object 3D-scanM

Software: Agisoft, PhotoshopM

Author: Daniil.

Our fourth task for Technology class was to make a 3D-scan of any object and after scanning it prsent the 3D-model in an App.

I decidee it would be interesting to scan the battery and compare its look in reality and how it is gonna look after the scanning.

Thus, I started with making 30 photos of the battery from various sides in order to meet the minimal requirements of the Agisoft App (minimum 30 photos needed to form a good shape of the object).

30 photos
Same photos after Photoshop editing

Actually. I have no idea why the 3d-object didn’t come in a proper way, I’ve tried several times, but nevertheless, I didn’t manage to make a good shaped battery.

Though, I decided to 3d-scan the battery via the Qlone App on my mobile phone. To use the program I printed the special dimension-paper, which helps the artificial intelligence to understand the right location of the scanned object.

Unfortunately, here the picture turned out to differ from my expectatons. No idea, maybe I did something wrong, but this is what I got.

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

CLASS:TECHNOLOGY, 3D-PRINTING

TASK: 3D-print useful thing

Machine:  Raise N2 (3D printer)

Software: AutoCad, Rhino 6.1, IdeaMaker

Material: plastic

Author: Daniil.

After Ivan gave us another task to make a 3D-print of something that would be beneficial in any case, I decided to make a 3D prototype of the smart watch, which would make their charging more convenient, because the problem I used to have was that the wire is quite long, and it was always muddling and becoming dirty when lying on the floor.

Thus, I started from creating a cylinder, which was ment to be the outer part of the item. to make the inner part I was inspired ny the coil they use in building field to wind various cables.

Outer part
1st prototype Inner part in Rhino 6.1

After some magic I managed to make the solid surface.

Here you can see final prototypes of the inner coil part.

After 3d-printing routine this stuff looks like this

Now I can wind my charging cable and hide all the

unnecessory length inside.

Just by plugging the inner part inside the outer one we get this:

Now I hope the charging will be more comfortable and organized 😉

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